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Film and Music of the Frieze Art Fair London 2012.

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Film and Music of the Frieze Art Fair London 2012.

David Franchi, 29th October 2012

“presented a curated programme”

Frieze Art Fair 2012 London, external image, Ph. Linda Nylind Courtesy of Linda Nylind/ Frieze

Frieze Art Fair London 2012 has presented a curated programme of Talks, Artists’ commissions, Film and Music projects, supported by Frieze Foundation, together with Outset Frieze Fair for Tate Collection. Frieze Art Fair London 2012 was organised on the main gallery section, Focus and Frame sections and the newly inaugurated Frieze Masters. Furthermore, as a part of Frieze Fair, the Sculpture Park was organised.

Frieze Music was established to develop the crossover between contemporary art and music. Frieze Music was originally created by Dan Fox, Senior Editor of Frieze Magazine, and Steve Mackey, producer and musician. Frieze Music’s varied programme has featured bands, avant-garde classical composer Karlheinz Stockhausen and pop series, such as that co-ordinated by Franz Ferdinand in 2004. Frieze Music has taken place during the week of the fair and attracted a wide audience.

Frieze Film is a programme of artist films screened to coincide with Frieze London. Curated by Sarah McCrory, this year’s commissions included five new films. The whole programme at Frieze Art Fair London 2012 was curated by Sarah McCrory, who did it also in 2011 and 2010.

The artists commissioned to make new work for Frieze Film are: Bertrand Dezoteux, Patricia Esquivias, Jimmy Merris, John Smith and Wu Tsang & Nana Oforiatta-Ayim.

This year’s commissioned artists presented a range of film-based practice that deals with ideas including those of history and memory, be it personal or collective. The way narrative is conveyed and constructed around individuals, buildings or objects and place is a theme that runs through the programme via imagined journeys, fictitious events and romantic relationships.

Commenting on Frieze Film this year, Sarah McCrory said: “The five newly commissioned artists have varied practices and backgrounds, and are both emerging and established artists. There are some connections between the humour in John Smith and Jimmy Merris’ work, and an investigation into place takes two wildly different directions in the work of Patricia Esquivias and Bertrand Dezoteux. Wu Tsang is presenting a new film in collaboration with writer and historian Nana Oforiatta-Ayim – a first time collaboration uniting their interests in otherness and the marginal.”

Frieze Film is commissioned and produced by Frieze Foundation. The tenth edition of Frieze London is sponsored for the ninth consecutive year by Deutsche Bank.

Bertrand Dezoteux

Bertrand Dezoteux’s film The History of France in 3D is a CGI animation project that presents a non-chronological history of France. The narrative structure of the film follows a journey on the French rail network in a train peopled with significant characters from French history, among them Roland Barthes, Jules Michelet and Juliette Foucault, the chief conductor of the train. Christopher Columbus and Saint Francis of Assisi will also get on board in Le Mans. Rather than being specifically about France, Dezoteux’s film suggests that France exists both as a tangible territory and as a virtual entity. Dezoteux describes The History of France in 3D as a journey ‘in a synthetic world that is “made of France”, just as a table is “made of wood”.’

Bertrand Dezoteux (b.1982) is a French artist based in Bayonne. Recent solo shows and projects include ‘Txerri’, le Carré, Bayonne (2012); ‘Le Corso’, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010) and ‘Roubaix 3000’, Espace Croisé, Roubaix (2007). Group shows include: ‘Low Mountains’, Dar Bellarj Foundation, Marrakech (2012); ‘Dynasty’, Palais de Tokyo et Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris (2010) and ‘Reset’, Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard, Paris (2010). Forthcoming shows will be at FRAC Aquitaine, Bordeaux (2012) and Sala Rekalde, Bilbao (2012).

Patricia Esquivias

Patricia Esquivias presented a video that revolves around a specific apartment block in Madrid that dates from the late 1950s and has decorative tiles on its façade and balconies, featuring a different pattern for each apartment. In this new work, Esquivias will try to read the building like a book; to sit in privacy and work out what happened in this specific building. She imagines situations which she hopes actually took place, weaving them into the images of the building – but usually the reality that she finds does not match her fantasies.

Patricia Esquivias (b.1979) is a Venezuelan artist based in Madrid. Recent solo exhibitions and projects include Hammer Projects, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2011); ‘Todo lo que no es ración, es agio’, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid and ‘Reads like the Paper, 2005-2009’, Midway Center for Contemporary Art, Minneapolis (both 2009). Group exhibitions include: ‘Stories in Between’, Stiftelsen 314, Bergen; ‘LifeStories’, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit, (both 2011); ‘Les Faux Amis’, Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris (2010); and ‘Younger than Jesus’, New Museum, New York (2009).

Jimmy Merris

Jimmy Merris will make a new video work by using a bamboo stick with a camera sellotaped to its end – an improvised steadicam. The work will be shot in and around his studio in south London and will be the first time the artist has filmed outside the studio for an extended period, but will still encompass his typical ad-hoc production methods; ‘the camera will then move back inside, perhaps through an open window, to record a series of domestic interiors, a new set of portraits, and joyful encounters with friends, neighbours, animals, and familiar objects which are just kicking around the yard here in South London’.

Jimmy Merris (b.1983) is a British artist based in London. Recent solo exhibitions include ‘Deep Joy on Home Soil’, Studio Voltaire, London (2012), ‘Economics 101’ (with Terry Dennett), SPACE, London and ‘Finding Your Feet In The Times Of The Worried Man’ Seventeen Gallery, London (both 2011).

John Smith

John Smith’s film, Three Things begins with three objects shown to him by his father shortly before he died. Two of these were well-used objects that had become so steeped in history that their original forms and functions were almost completely obscured. A third object seemed to be instantly recognisable, but it turned out to be something else entirely. Taking these ambiguous artefacts as its starting point, Three Things will create a dialogue between abstraction and literal meaning, exploring the contradictions of memory and history to hint at the perceived character of a dead father and his relationship with his son.

John Smith (b.1952) is a British artist based in London. Recent solo shows and projects include ‘Horizon’, Turner Contemporary, Margate (2012); ‘Bildstörung’, Kestnergesellschaft, Hanover (2012); ‘Worst Case Scenario’, Weserburg Museum of Modern Art, Bremen (2012) and ‘unusual Red cardigan, PEER, London (2011). Group shows include: ‘Image Counter Image’, Haus der Kunst, Munich (2012); ‘Locus Solus: Impressions of Raymond Roussel’, Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid (2011) and Serralves Museum, Porto (2012); ‘Descriptive Acts’, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2012) and ‘Has the Film Already Started’, Tate Britain, London (2011). Forthcoming shows include Ferens Art Gallery, Hull (2012) and Espai, Barcelona (2012).

Wu Tsang & Nana Oforiatta-Ayim

Wu Tsang & Nana Oforiatta-Ayim will present a short film that explores narratives of inclusion and otherness in a world in which relativity has liberated our sense of difference, de-centered the margins, and where, paradoxically, inequality and racism are more prevalent than ever. The film is set in a hybrid landscape made up of St Louis, Senegal and Los Angeles, USA and inspired by films including Douglas Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows and Rainer Fassbinder’s Ali: Angst Essen Seele Auf. The main characters include a Senegalese royal and a British working-class interloper. Their love, illicit in the eyes of the world, at first triumphs, then falters, the pressures of the outside world internalised, leaving us to question whether the equaliser of love and connection can win out against the constructions of difference and self. A Frieze Film & UKS Co-Production.

Wu Tsang (b.1982) is an American artist based in Los Angeles. Recent group exhibitions include ‘The Whitney Biennial 2012’, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; ‘The Ungovernables: The 2012 New Museum Triennial’, New Museum, New York (both 2012) and ‘Performa 11’, New York (2011). His recent feature film, Wildness, world premiered at MoMA’s ‘Documentary Fortnight’, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012). Tsang is a 2012 Louis Comfort Tiffany Fellow and has received support from the Good Works Foundation, Frameline, the Wexner Center for the Arts, the IFP Documentary Lab, Art Matters, and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Nana Oforiatta-Ayim is a writer, filmmaker and cultural historian, currently based in Senegal. Her work has been presented in ‘The Ungovernables: The 2012 New Museum Triennial’ New Museum, New York (2012); the Neue Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst, Berlin; Vela Gallery, London; The Museum of African Diaspora, San Francisco, and will be shown at the Kunstmuseene Bergen, Norway later this year.

From 11th until 14th October 2012 at Regent’s Park, London.

Written by davidfranchi

October 29, 2012 at 10:41 pm

Wessex Studios – The Highbury church that made the rock history

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Saint Augustines Church – a particular

The Highbury church that made the history of rock.

David Franchi

After few days of working from home and with sunshine weather, I decided to take a walk on New Highbury Park, Islington. Here buildings and part of the surrounding area are from the mid- nineteenth century, built in a typical Italianate style.

Strolling around I arrive to St. Augustine church, part of the Anglican Evangelical tradition of the Church of England. Members of the parish mirror the very mixed population of Highbury, counting at least 22 different nationalities. Notably activities include the children school, the Islington Choir, groups for exploring Christianity, praying, fare trading, campaigning against poverty and climate change.  

Redevelopment has started so St. Augustine is closed. This particular edifice was built in 1869, in replacement of a temporary church first established in 1864. A parish was assigned to the church in 1871, taken from the ones of Christ Church and Saint Paul’s. The structure was restored in 1982. The church seats around 1,150 people. The building is made of brick with stone dressings, designed by Habershon and Brock in the Decorated style, typical of the Gothic Revival – or Victorian Gothic – architecture, practised in England in the second half of the nineteenth century.

But the most interesting part of the building is the peculiar church hall. Built in 1881, later on it will become a piece of the history of the music, hosting the very famous “Wessex Sound Studios” a recording venue for rock legends. Now, astonishingly, it has been transformed into homes.

In the 1960s, the Thompson family converted the church hall into a recording studio. They named it ‘Wessex’ because their previous recording studio was located in Bournemouth, in the Ancient English county of Wessex.

George Martin, the legendary producer of The Beatles, bought the studios in 1965 and make of it one of the hottest rock place of the history. Wessex lasted for 40 years and in Britain it was second only to Abbey Road studios for equipment and frequentation. In 1975, Chrysalis bought the studios and George Martin became a director of the company.

The list of music personalities who have worked at the Wessex Studios is amazing. Here the Sex Pistols recorded many of their albums, including the revolutionary ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’ in 1977. The Clash recorded their celebrated – but never enough – ‘London Calling’ two years later. The Queen used the venue for ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’. For ‘We will rock you’ The Queen recorded the notorious ‘boom-boom-cha boom-boom-cha’ of the song making the whole staff of the studios jump on the pavement.

Additionally, worked here Rolling Stones, The Pretenders, King Crimson, Marianne Faithfull, XTC, King, Slade, Peter Townshend, Jesus and Mary Chain, John Cougar Mellencamp, Theatre of Hate, Kylie, Talk Talk, Nick Cave, REM, Motorhead, The Moody Blues, Dido, Coldplay, Elvis Costello, Bob Geldof, The Damned, The Stone Roses, The Specials, Enya, Nik Kershaw, Erasure, Judas Priest, Tina Turner, and David Bowie. The list could probably be longer if one just had enough time to make research.

But time passes by and in 2003 the building was sold to Neptune Group and later converted into a residential development. Today the place is known as “The Recording Studio” and it contains eight apartments and a townhouse. The website of the agent declares that The Recording Studio “might not make you a rock star – “but at least you can live like one”. Ironically, for a property here in a rock’ n’ roll location you need to have a lot of cash to meet the expenses.

Wessex Studios were famous for having the newest technologies of which the celebrated mixing desk ‘40 channel SSL 4048E console’ is still alive nowadays and used in a recording studio located in Llangennech, Carmarthenshire, in South Wales.

But this is not all. Another involving site is just nearby few steps further on. At the 124 Highbury Park, it is possible to find the house of David Gestetner, an Hungarian scientists who was the inventor of the Gestetner stencil duplicator, the first piece of office equipment that allowed production of numerous copies of documents quickly and inexpensively. Or better to say the ancestor of the photocopy machine. On 15th March 2011, Gestetner received a Blue Plaque on his home at 124 Highbury New Park.

Well, it is strange to go for a relaxing walk and find out the history of music, together with the one of the office equipment. Though it is now past, it’s always worth to amble and then go back home searching for the amazing history of this place on the internet.

Written by davidfranchi

December 13, 2011 at 12:53 am

Posted in Italian language articles

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Ludovico Einaudi, Taranta at the Barbican

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David Franchi – 27th June 2011
“Einaudi, Taranta and the Barbican”
 
It was a double standing ovation for the “Notte della Taranta!” the concert performed by Ludovico Einaudi and Notte della Taranta Orchestra at the Barbican. The internationally renowned Italian musician returned to London with new musical idea. The “Notte della Taranta” is a piece of the Italian culture, not only music, coming from Salento, the southern area of Apulia Region.

The word Taranta comes from the spider tarantula, a common and dangerous insect living in the area. It was believed that playing these songs women affected by the spider poison could be saved. However, in recent times it is more understood that the tradition was connected with freedom of expression: in a rural and strict society it was the only moment women could speak freely and reveal their inner thoughts, perhaps without being poisoned at all. Recently the Taranta was rediscovered and, with an accurate work on popular traditions, brought to success by Melpignano Festival. The director of the 2010 Festival – bringing 100,000 visitors each year to the small village of Melpignano – was Ludovico Einaudi himself.

At the Barbican the concert was so appreciated that some women started dancing in the back of the room. Because this is, of course, music for women, developed nowadays in a liberation movement with roots that lasts more than a century. And it was an explosion of joy at the end of the concert. Einaudi blended many Mediterranean traditions inviting guest stars, with whom he already collaborated, such as the Greek singer Savina Yannatou, the Turkish multi-instrumentalist and DJ, Mercan Dede, and the Malian kora player, Ballake Sissoko.

Einaudi has refreshed the tradition by writing new music. Though mixed with other traditions – including an Australian didgeridoo – the main music was the Taranta, with Einaudi directing the orchestra and playing parts of his usual minimalistic tunes. Alongside original interpretation of the untamed La Notte della Taranta, Ludovico Einaudi performed a few of his own pieces in thrilling new arrangements. Dancing is also a notable aspect of the Taranta, that imitates the effects of the spider poison, and therefore there were two female dancers. But also a Sufi dancer with traditional clothes, reminding the unique geographical position of the Salento, facing Greece and Albania, haven for Crusaders, invaded by Normans and Moors, part of the Bourbons reign and ‘absorbed’ by the Italian unification in the 19th century. The music perfectly condensed the thousand years past of the Salento. If your imagination was strong enough, you would be almost able to physically be there, watching the seashore under the hot summer sun, even smell the perfumes of olives and vineyards. The contrast between Ludovico Einaudi, from the northern region of the Piedmont were man are famous to be stiff, and the wild music from the hot southern Apulia, could be merged creating an extraordinary concert.

Strictly, for Italians only then? Not really, as the songs are in the various dialects of the area ‘Salentino’, or maybe ‘Grico’ or ‘Arberesche’ of Greek and Albanian origins.

Published for: www.remotegoat.co.uk

Direct link: http://www.remotegoat.co.uk/review_view.php?uid=7115

Written by davidfranchi

June 29, 2011 at 3:38 pm

Filomena Campus Quartet feat Antonio Forcione and Jean Toussaint – Jazz Club Soho London

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Jazz Italian Campus in Soho
by David Franchi – 25th May 2011

It was another great performance of Filomena Campus Quartet at the Pizza Express Jazz Club Soho, London. The Italian singer together with her Quartet and a couple of friends, Antonio Forcione and Jean Toussaint, has done a fantastic concert.

She performed songs from her new album “Jester of jazz” and some songs from her duo with Antonio Forcione. The line up of the Filomena Campus Quartet is composed of Filomena Campus (vocals), Steve Lodder (piano), Dudley Phillips (double bass), and Winston Clifford (drums) who in this occasion were joined by the special guests Jean Toussaint (sax) and Antonio Forcione (guitar).

Filomena has a great and eclectic voice, Toussaint is a charming musician and Forcione is astonishing gifted, while the other components of the band are talented and experienced artists.

Filomena dyes her performances with the colours of Harlequin costume. In her gigs she blends various genres of music but always within a jazz frame. Besides, her new album is inspired by Commedia dell’Arte and Theatre Of The Absurd adding a hint of theatrical style to the performance. There is also a vast component of her Sardinian legacy mixed with Italian theatre. The roots of Filomena Campus, in fact, are Sardinian, the big Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea, from which she takes inspiration.

During the concert at the Jazz Club Soho, in fact, Filomena Campus performed some songs in Italian and in her own dialect, such as the classical folk ballad ‘No podu repusare’, ‘The queen and the clowns’ dedicated to the famous Italian artists Franca Rame and Stefano Benni or ‘Sabbia e mirto’ inspired to the Mediterranean sea. But also she performed songs in English reviving the variegated jazz tradition. With Antonio Forcione, they played songs from their Duo repertoire, with a special solo performance of Forcione who showed great technical ability. The concert ended with a great final jointly with Toussaint who as usual masterly ’embroidered’ the tones.

Filomena Campus is an international artist well- known as jazz vocalist and also as theatre director. She has toured and collaborated with top UK jazz musicians including Evan Parker, Guy Barker, Orphy Robinson, Byron Wallen, Cleveland Watkiss, Jean Toussaint, Antonio Forcione and the London Improvisers Orchestra.

In 2010 Filomena founded the ‘Filomena Campus Quartet’ with Steve Lodder, Dudley Phillips and Winston Clifford and “Jester of Jazz” is their new original project. In these days they are touring in Germany, Italy and Croatia.

Published for: www.remotegoat.co.uk

Direct link: http://www.remotegoat.co.uk/review_view.php?uid=6998

Written by davidfranchi

May 27, 2011 at 11:00 am

St. Augustine’s Church & Wessex Studios – Highbury, London

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Highbury church and rock history”

by David Franchi – 10th April 2011

The Highbury church that made the history of rock.

After few days of working from home and with sunshine weather, I decided to take a walk in New Highbury Park, Islington, where buildings and part of the surrounding area are from the mid- nineteenth century.

Strolling around I arrive to St. Augustine church, part of the Anglican, Evangelical tradition of the Church of England. The members of the parish represent the very mixed population of Highbury, counting at least 22 different nationalities. Redevelopment has started, and the church is closed while the builders are in. Notably activities include the children school, the Islington Choir, groups for exploring Christianity, praying, fare trading, campaigning against poverty or climate change.

This particular building was built in 1869, in replacement of a temporary church first established in 1864. A parish was assigned to the church in 1871, taken from the ones of Christ Church and Saint Paul’s. The structure was restored in 1982. The church seats around 1,150 people. The building is made of brick with stone dressings, designed by Habershon and Brock in the Decorated style, typical of the Gothic Revival (or Victorian Gothic) architecture, practised in England in the second half of the nineteenth century.

But the major part of the building is the peculiar church hall. Built in 1881, later on it will become a piece of the history of
the music, hosting the very famous “Wessex Sound Studios” a recording venue for rock’ n’ roll legends. Now, astonishingly, it’s been transformed into homes.

In the 1960s, the Thompson family converted the church hall into a recording studio. They named it ‘Wessex’ because their previous recording studio was located in Bournemouth, in the Ancient English county of Wessex. George Martin, the legendary producer of The Beatles, bought the building in 1965 and make of it one of the hottest rock place of the history. Wessex lasted for 40 years and in Britain it was second only to Abbey Road for equipment and frequentation. In 1975, Chrysalis bought the studios and George Martin became a director of the company.

The list of music personalities who worked at the Wessex Studios is amazing. Here the Sex Pistols recorded many of their albums, including the revolutionary ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’ in 1977. The Clash recorded their celebrated – but never enough – ‘London Calling’ two years later. The Queen used the venue for ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ and ‘We will rock you’. Additionally, worked here Rolling Stones, The Pretenders, King Crimson, Marianne Faithfull, XTC, King, Slade, Peter Townshend, Jesus and Mary Chain, John Cougar Mellencamp, Theatre of Hate, Kylie, Talk Talk, Nick Cave, REM, Motorhead, The Moody Blues, Dido, Coldplay, Elvis Costello, Bob Geldof, The Damned, The Stone Roses, The Specials, Enya, Nik Kershaw, Erasure, Judas Priest, Tina Turner, and David Bowie. The list could probably be longer if one just had enough time to make research.

But time passes by and in 2003 the building was sold to Neptune Group which later converted it into a residential development. Today the place is known as “The Recording Studio” and it contains eight apartments and a townhouse. The internet site of the agent declares that The Recording Studio “might not make you a rock star – “but at least you can live like one”. Ironically, for a property here in a rock’ n’ roll location you need to have a lot of cash meet the expenses. Wessex Studios were famous for having the most new technologies. However, the mythical mixing desk ’40 channel SSL 4048E console’ now is still alive and used in a recording studio, located in Llangennech, Carmarthenshire, in South Wales. Well, it is strange to go for a relaxing walk and find out the history of music. Though it is now past, it’s always worth to amble and then go back home searching for the amazing history of this place on the internet.

Published for: www.remotegoat.co.uk

Direct link: http://www.remotegoat.co.uk/review_view.php?uid=6843

Written by davidfranchi

May 18, 2011 at 8:27 pm

Paolo Fresu and Ralph Towner together in a London concert.

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Saturday, 26th March 2011 – David Franchi

Paolo_Fresu_1_It was much applauded the London concert “Ralph Towner and Paolo Fresu” at the Southbank Centre, the last 10th March. In the London concert they played a repertoire from their acclaimed album “Chiaroscuro” (2009), together with jazz classic and some Towner compositions. Their outstanding improvisation abilities, merged with an impressively musical talent and with the subtle style of the performance has created a memorable concert. The sound reminds a New Age approach overcoming the usual jazz music. The combination of trumpet and flugelhorn and acoustic guitars is a definitely but refined atypical beat. They have a wholly characteristic sound, especially in the tones extremely personal and unique.

During the London concert, Ralph Towner explained ‘Punta Giara’ was the first piece he ever played with Paolo Fresu, when they participated to a festival in Sardinia fifteen years ago. Towner is now resident in Italy and it was simple to get together again with Fresu, but they did it just in 2009, thirteen years later, recording the album ‘Chiaroscuro’ for the ECM.

This was their first UK tour together. Ralph Towner and Paolo Fresu are two masters of music.

Multi- instrumentalist Ralph Towner is an iconic musician. Born in Chehalis, Washington (USA), the 1st of March 1940, he is well-known for the renowned group Oregon which has been in existence for 40 years. He has made notable recordings of jazz, classical music, folk music, and world music.

Born into a musical family, his mother a piano teacher and his father a trumpet player, Towner learned the piano improvisation at the age of three. He started trumpet lessons at the age of five. He first played jazz in New York City in the late 1960s as a pianist and was strongly influenced by Bill Evans. He joined Consort of Paul Winter the world music pioneer in the late 1960s and in the same period, already at the University, he began improvising on guitars.

Towner left the Consort in 1970 to form the group Oregon. In the 1970s they released numerous highly influential records mixing folk music, Indian classical forms, and avant-garde jazz-influenced free improvisation.

 

Paolo Fresu and Ralph Towner together in a London concert.

At the same time, Towner has began a longstanding collaboration with the label ECM. He worked with Jack DeJohnette, Keith Jarrett, Jan Garbarek, Kenny Wheeler, Weather Reports, and Egberto Gismonti and played as a duet with Gary Burton, John Abercrombie and Gary Peacock.

Paolo Fresu, born in Berchidda, Sardinia, the 10th February 1961, is an Italian leading trumpet/flugelhorn player, receiving numerous prestigious awards. Apart from his own outstanding groups, he has played with an eclectic cast of famous musicians including Dave Holland, John Zorn, Jim Hall, Uri Caine and many more, whilst Carla Bley wrote an album specifically to showcase his sound, The Lost Chords Find Paolo Fresu.

 _________________________________________________________

 

Paolo Fresu and Ralph Towner together in a London concert.

After the London concert we met Paolo Fresu for an interview.

“A duet with Ralph Towner, guitar and trumpet, something special, not really jazz…”

“Well it’s a project undoubtedly very special and brave. It is born in a studio. Ralph Towner asked to me to share this project, so we went to a recording studio. With him, we met 15 years before, as he reminded during the today London concert, in Sardinia in a shared project, but we had no further meeting. So we recorded this album for the prestigious ECM that has had a good success. The idea to make concerts is born at that time. It is three years we are touring everywhere in Europe and in the US. It’s a really brave project, doubtless. It is very unusual, indeed, to use trumpet and acoustic guitars. Results have been heard tonight here at the Purcell Room.”

“A beautiful concert, the audience appreciated it. The music is something different. It is not your usual jazz, reminds more the New Age music style.”

“Well I don’t know what it reminds. To be honest I really have an extremely vast musical horizon. I have very quote ‘classical’ unquote projects, and I have completely different projects very much mélangé, as French people will say, with world music, with other kinds of music. This present project is for sure one in between them and it is an indefinable one, because we have jazz but not only: we have world music, we have contemporary music, we have a bit of everything. It worth to say that ECM released my album ‘Mistico Mediterraneo’ (ed. Mystic Mediterranean), which involve a Corsican choir and a bandoneon and that is even more advanced of the one we played tonight. ‘Mistico Mediterraneo’ is a really indefinable music. Instead, here tonight with Rowland is still in a jazz range, let’s say so, we have the improvisation, though it is not the traditional one, and we used traditional jazz history materials. Tonight we played three jazz standard ‘Blue in Green’, ‘Beautiful love’ and ‘I fall in love too easily’. Therefore, there is a link with jazz history. Speaking generally, the new project I made with ECM, the one with the Corsican choir, for instance it is a completely different music area. I have to say, I like to hone from a musical world to another one, sometimes maybe catching off guard for the audience…”

“So there is already an album. Will this project go on for a long time?”

“Well, the album was released two years ago. Today it was the next to last concert of our English tour started the 3rd of March; so today in London it was our eighth concert. We played everywhere in the UK. Tomorrow we will play in Manchester. Then we have a week off. We will go on tour ending in the middle of April, playing in Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Turkey and other countries. There are other forthcoming tours. Therefore, we can say it is a project that exists and it is not unlikely that we will record again a new album, having seen the success of the last one.”

photo:actmusic.com

Published for: www.italoeuropeo.co.uk

Direct Link: http://www.italoeuropeo.com/entertaiment/music/paolo-fresu-and-ralph-towner-together-in-a-london-concert./

Written by davidfranchi

March 28, 2011 at 6:33 pm

Chris Leslie, interviewing a Fairport Convention member.

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Wednesday, 23rd February 2011 – David Franchi
Chris LeslieFairport Convention is a leading band of the folk rock movement born in 1960s.
Today they are still recording, live performing and hosting, since 1979, the Cropredy Festival, near Banbury, Oxfordshire, the largest such annual event in UK.
At the concert of the 19th February 2011 at the Union Chapel in Highbury, London,
we have met Fairport member Chris Leslie, composer, and vocal and multi-
instrumentalist and had an interview.
 
D. After one year back in London in the Union Chapel again.
A. “Yes, it’s great to be here. We’ve had lovely time when we played last time. We’ll hope to repeat same thing again this evening. Yeah it’s great to be here.”
 
D. This year there is also a new album and Cropredy Festival just won the TPi award.
A. “Yes, the festival won TPi and we’re very pleased about that because we think that, obviously, it’s a flagship for our festival. We run in a so much work and experience over 30 plus years now. And I think, I recall good things about that it  takes many years to get right. You build; you get fantastic experience after decades. It’s something happening. This year it gets the awards that we’re very pleased. Particularly, I’m Chrissie Leslie here I’m part of the band, but I have very little to do with the organising of the festival. Really it has all done by Gareth Williams, Dave Pegg and Sam Nichol the three major players in it. What’s wonderful tour’s crew is from the festival, so all the people have the input. It’s like a lovely thing to be recognised. It’s a hard work coming off. So we’re here with the brand new album, Festival Bell, which I’m very pleased with, literally finished in the back end of the last year. So it’s the first tour we’re taking it out. We’re doing a show in two halves: in the first half we’re bringing back an album which was released 40 years ago. An album called ‘Babbacome Lee’. Most of the material was written by Dave Swarbrick with contributions from Simon Nicol and from Dave Pegg. The line up at the time the album was produced was Dave Swarbrick, Dave Pegg, Sam Nicol and Dave Mattecks. And it’s a concept album. Remember concept albums?”
 
D. Very old style…
A. “Yeah, yeah and it tells the tale of a man called John Lee, hanged from his small village in Devon, called Babbacombe. To take a long story short he was accused of murder and sentenced to be hanged in the bad old days. They try to hang him three times and the scaffolding wouldn’t work.”
 
D. Is it a true story?
A. “It’s a true story, yeah. Late eighteenth hundreds it happened. Later on he was sentenced but sentences back to the old of the eighteenth break rocks! But Dave Swarbrick found the story in a series of old newspaper 30 years ago in an antique shop. The album was fathered by that tale and put together in this album. So the first half of the show we’re doing that album completely from the start to the finish as it is on the LP. And in the second half we’re doing the brand new album, most of them, not all the set of the new album, you know, but possibly 90% is from the new album. So it’s a very nice show to be taking out. Because it celebrates Fairport Convention past and celebrating Fairport present and the future.”
 
D. The future of Fairport Convention?
A. “Well to keep touring and keep making music that we want to make. There’s nothing like getting new material out I think. It’s nice because Fairport has a fantastic back catalogue to deep into bowl. I mean of course ‘Babbacombe’ is an exception. To do a complete new album usually we can do back in all those kinds of areas of the band and pull stuffs into the present line if it’s suit. We’ve always had current materials going alongside. Rick writes great instrumentals and I write some songs and we’ll find songs other great songwriters. So it’s always good to have a new album. Fairport tour has to do with current repertoire; it’s never just look backwards. But it’s wonderful to have a beautiful back catalogue to go back to.” 

Written by davidfranchi

February 23, 2011 at 8:31 pm